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How to Write a Video Game Script

Writing a video game script offers a challenge that goes well beyond the normal realm of writing. But it is also something that can be tremendously rewarding in the scope of its creativity. Here are some guidelines and tips for writing a video game script.

Today’s video games are based in complex worlds and they tell stories. No longer does a player simply advance through repetitive screens slaying goblins and ghouls in a quest toward the goal. A player now expects to progress through a world where there is a rich history and a plethora of decisions to be made. This adds to the complexity of writing a video game script and it also adds to the richness of the creativity involved.

The first thing you need to think about is that writing a video game script is that it is not the same as writing a movie script. The two processes are similar and you do write a movie like script for your video game but that is only part of the process. There is a whole host of accompanying materials that you need to write for your game script. Here is an overview of what you need to write and why.

Write An Executive overview of the story in prose

This is the most important part of your game script and this is what will sink or float your script. This overview has to tell a compelling and unique story and it should tell the complete story from the opening scene of the game through the major steps all the way to the completion of the game. An overview like this can be almost any size and it would be very easy for this to be ten written pages or more. Remember that today’s video games are very complex and the stories can be very complex. This overview is also the most important part of the script. You would shop this to game developers to see if they are interested in developing it into a game.

Write a History and Background of the world

Video games are complete worlds and game designers need to know what the world is like and what kind of history it has. This will help the designers to visualize what the world will look like.

Create a Flowchart for the entire game

Your game is going to be very complex and there will be many decisions that the player will have to make and each decision opens up a whole new path for the player to take. Creating a flowchart is the best way to keep track of all the possible paths through the game.

Create sub-quests and write a prose overview of each quest

Sub quests can be simple or complex but each one is a story in itself and you must tell these stories.

Create character descriptions and bios for all the major characters in the game.

Game designers need a complete picture of the characters in the game. Many of the non-player characters you create will pop up time and time again. And their story is woven deeply into the fabric of your world. You need to describe this relationship in detail to the game designers.

Write interactions with non-player characters

Your game will probably involve interaction with non-player characters (NPC’s). You should write out the dialogue and flowchart the choices the game player can make. These interactions are often critical to the story and they can take the player on very different paths toward the conclusion of the game.

Write Cut scenes

Cut Scenes are short animations or movies that come before or after major plot points in your story. A cut scene should always be written to enhance or describe the story. A cut scene is also a reward given to the player for achieving a major milestone in game play.

Writing the actual storyboard script

This is the final step in the whole video game script writing process and it is the most detailed. You do this step last because you need all the supporting materials to understand and describe this correctly. This part is very similar to that of a movie script. You progress through each scene of your story and you detail all the necessary information. Here is an example:

Scene 1:

Location: A dark cathedral with stained glass windows. An NPC is kneeling before a stone casket in the center of the main room

Music: background music of an organ playing introduces the scene but subsides

Characters: Main player, NPC named Thomas, seven were creatures

Player Goal: Discover the location of the underground lair

Action: Player must initiate discussion with Thomas, upon first contact we activate cut scene (1) where Thomas morphs into a were-creature and summons his were-minions. Main character must battle the were-minions then re-initiate discussion with Thomas.

Flowchart: No decisions made at this point: If battle is completed Thomas reveals the entrance to the underground lair and player advances to that level. If player is defeated in battle revert to death cut scene (11) and move to try again screen.

Notes: Player is locked in the cathedral and there is no exit. The only viable way out is to initiate contact with Thomas. Random were-creatures can be activated if player explores cathedral before talking with NPC.

Scene End

When writing a video game script you have to remember that your primary audience is not the game player but the game developer and what the developer needs is a complete picture of what your game is about. This means that you are not just writing a story but you are creating a world complete with a tone, sounds, characters, story, plot, and subplots. To successfully communicate this to the developer you need to use a whole set of creative tools and this is where video game scripts depart from normal scripts and open up a whole realm of creative possibilities.

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Disruptive Technologies, Part 2: Music Editors and Steam Engines are Still Related

I have illustrated on how music editors are related to steam engines in Part 1. Why so loose a connection? Because I want to stress the universal timeline from the early days of steam engines to the modernity of music editors, during which technology has evolved in waves of disruption.

Now somebody might break that already loose relationship.

John C. Dvorak, a very reputed columnist, fervently argues that there is no Clay Christensen disruptive technology in its very own coined definition: disruptive technologies are low performers, “less expensive technologies that enter a heated scene where the established technology is outpacing people’s ability to adapt to it”.

Is my music editors – steam engines connection invalid then, as there is no disruptive, let alone sustaining, technology? I thought so. Yes, I thought so, as in his paper, Dvorak rebukes so persuasively all purported disruptive technologies: the microcomputers are not cheaper than the minicomputers, and neither do internet sales supplant bookstores. His points are convincing, covering even the titans among the believed disruptive technologies of digital photography and Linux.

But I think again, “independently”. And let me re-affirm with you that despite the distant connection, music editors and steam engines are indeed parts of the twin aspects of technology, disruptive and sustaining.

Microcomputers were not cheaper, because the smaller-sized disks were more expensive. However, microcomputers were not the disruptive technology. It is the smaller-sized disk drives. When the sustaining technology of cost-saving capacity improvement came, the disruptive technology of smaller-sized drives truly took over as they achieved the same price points as larger-sized drives. The smaller-sized drives are thus cheaper in utility terms. Isn’t it now a disruptor?

Internet sales, on the other hand, might not outperform bookstores yet. But even that fits into the definition of a disruptive technology: it is an initial low performer. That internet sales would exceed bookstore revenues, especially when there are more credit card holders than ever nowadays, seems a good bet.

Thus, in similar arguments, it is fair to state that perhaps the conclusion that Linux and digital photography not being disruptive technologies is somewhat untimely. And who knows if digital photography is not cheaper because it can’t be cheaper or because it is so in demand its economic price can’t be lower?

If you are not yet convinced, Napster and VoIP technologies will make you. They fit into every aspect of Clay Christensen’s definition of disruptive technologies.

Napster was inferior, it was sued for copyrights violation and eventually shut down. But this first peer-to-peer music sharing program was not only cheaper (in fact, users only needed to pay for their internet access and the music editors if they wish to morph the songs before sharing) than what conventional music producers offer, but also quickly revolutionized the way people listen to music (so quickly that it had to be shut down as the then legal framework had yet to accommodate its form). Napster is non-existent now. But its variants are growing strong. And the sustaining industry of music editor softwares has carved out a niche market for its own. This is typical of a disruptive technology, one that not only changes the way things are, but also brings on other flows of goods and services.

In addition, Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) is another epitome of disruptive technologies. Telephony is getting cheaper, but VoIP is free (except for the internet access). And VoIP boasts efficient pioneers the like of Skype and Vonage that threaten to outdate traditional telephony practices. In fact, telecommunication services have become so complex consumers could not fully utilize their functions, thus turning to simpler services and paying only for what is relevant to their needs. That is how Sweden’s Comviq has seized 39% of the market from the incumbent Telia by offering half as many handset features and simpler pricing plans. But telecommunications will soon be free; VoIP will soon disrupt even the like of Comviq. And the sustainers that will keep VoIP evolving will be the class of voice changer softwares and cheaper and faster internet connection.

Ala, my music editors and steam engines are still related.

The War on Used Games

As we prepare for the coming wave of next generation systems, we should be anticipating improvements on all the good things we associate with the current crop of systems. Moving forward we expect: better graphics, faster processors, more engaging games, you get the idea. But not everything that we’re anticipating will be a progressive movement for gaming. At least, as far as Sony and Microsoft are concerned, you can wave goodbye to playing used games on their systems. Although these are just rumors at this point, it wouldn’t be surprising if they came to fruition. It’s very plausible, especially when taking into consideration that several game publishers have already fired shots at the used game market.

Most notable is Electronic Arts(EA), who became the first publisher to institute the practice of charging gamers, who bought used games, a fee to access codes that come with the game. To elaborate, Downloadable Content(DLC) codes are included with new copies of a particular game and only with those codes, can that content be accessed. EA expanded its project to include playing used games online. Gamers would now have to pay $10, in addition to the cost of the used game that they purchased, in order to have access to the online components of their game. Ubisoft has since followed suit, requiring an online pass for its games as well. You can identify the games which require an online pass as they bare the,”Uplay Passport”, logo on the box.

Ubisoft decided they’d take things a step further and implement Digital Rights Management, a practice more often associated with DVD or CD anti-piracy efforts. Assassins Creed 2 was the first game to be effected by this practice. In order to play the PC version of Assassins Creed 2, gamers are required to create an account with Ubisoft and remain logged into that account in order to play the game. This means that if you lose your internet connection, the game will automatically pause and try to reestablish the connection. However, if you’re unfortunate enough to be unable to reconnect to the internet you’ll have to continue from your last saved game; losing any progress you may have made since then. This will be the case for all of Ubisoft’s PC titles, regardless of one playing single-player or multi-player. While Digital Rights Management has been used to combat DVD and CD piracy for quite some time now, this will mark the first time it’s been used for a video game. In light of Ubisoft’s implementation of DRM, Matthew Humphries of Geek.com, cautions that it’s feasible that eventually even console games will require online registration in order to play them.

So what’s the reason for all of this? According to According to Denis Dyack, the head of Silicon Knights, the sale of used games is cannibalizing the profit of the primary game market. He also claims that the used game market is somehow causing the price of new games to rise. His proposed solution is to move away from physical disks and embrace digital distribution. Essentially he’d like to see services like Steam or EA’s Origin replace traditional hard copies. There are even rumors that the X-Box 720 will embrace the exclusive use of digital downloads and not use disks at all. Whether Microsoft will actually follow through with that plan remains to be seen.

One could argue that Sony has already laid the ground work for preventing used games from functioning on their future system. At the very least, they’ve already made quite an effort to make used games significantly less desirable. Kath Brice, of Gamesindustry.biz, reported that the latest SOCOM game for PSP, SOCOM: U.S. Navy SEALs Fireteam Bravo 3, will require customers who purchase a used copy to pay an addition $20 dollars to receive a code for online play.

I’d like to see some quantifiable evidence to support the claim that used games are in fact hurting the sales of new games at all. Without some actual facts, it sounds to me like a whole lot to do about nothing. Case in point, within 24 hours Modern Warfare 3 sold 6.5 million copies, grossing $400 million dollars in sales. Correct me if I’m wrong but you haven’t heard Infinity Ward complaining about the used game market and it affecting their bottom line. That’s likely because they’re too busy counting their money earned by creating games that people actually want to play. Imagine that. Maybe the problem isn’t that used games have a negative impact on the sale of new games but, the problem is instead that game developers need to make better games that gamers are willing to pay full price for.

In my opinion, not every game is worth $60 simply because it’s the suggested retail price. Looking at things objectively, not every game is created equally, therefore not every game is worthy of costing $60. Whether it’s because that particular game failed to meet expectations and live up to the hype or because it lacks any sort of replay value. It’s ludicrous to argue that gamers should pay top dollar for every game especially when they all too often turn out to be horrible disappointments, like Ninja Gadian 3, or they’re riddled with glitches like Skyrim.

I suspect that the War on Used Games is nothing more than a money grab by developers, upset that they’re unable to cash in on a very lucrative market. To put it in dollars and cents, in 2009 GameStop reported nearly $2.5 million dollars in revenue from the sale of used consoles and used games. And not one red cent of that profit reaches the pockets of game publishers. Greed as the motivating factor for the declaration of War on Used Games is transparent. Especially when you consider that when GameStop began separating their revenue from new games and used games in their financial statements, EA thereafter instituted their $10 dollar fee for used games.

In the absence of empirical evidence, I’ll have to settle for anecdotal. I’ll use myself as an example. I’m planning to purchase a used copy of Ninja Gaidan 2. I’ve never been a huge fan of the series. I didn’t play the first one because I didn’t have an Xbox and at the time it was an Xbox exclusive. And I never played the original version. Needless to say, I was never clamoring to play Ninja Gaidan 2. However the innovation in the second incarnation of the game, which allows you to disembowel your enemies, is enough of a novelty that I’d like to play through it at some point. I can buy it now, used, for about 10 dollars. If it was only being sold at full price I would more than likely pass on playing it altogether or maybe rent it. My point is that game developers are not losing money because of used games; you can’t miss money you weren’t going to receive anyway. They’re simply not getting money they weren’t going to get to begin with.

Unless you have a significant amount of disposable income and a considerable amount of free time, you’re probably like me and you prioritize which games you plan to purchase and how much you’re willing to pay for them. You decide which games are must haves and which games you’d like to play but are willing to wait for a price drop before getting them. Then there are the games which you’re interested in, but they tend to fall through the cracks because they’re not all that high on your radar and you’ll maybe pick them up several months later, or even years after their release, if you ever pick them up at all.

I find it ironic that the looming death of the used game market could likely spell the demise of GameStop who, ironically, push their customers to pre-order new games and purchase them at full price. One would think that game publishers would be appreciative about this service and not detest GameStop and treat used games with such scorn. Pre-orders not only help promote their games but they function as a forecast of potential sales as well. Even Dave Thier, a contributor for Forbes Online, who describes GameStop as, “a parasitic bloodsucker that doesn’t do much besides mark up discs and sit in the mall”, recognizes the folly of passing the burden of the used game market onto the consumer.

I’ve only once pre-ordered a game myself. At the behest of J. Agamemnon, I pre-ordered Battlefield 3, which is ironically a property of EA. I paid full price for this game and was happy to do so. In large part because I was granted access to several weapons and maps that I would have had to wait to download had I not pre-ordered it. I propose that instead of punishing gamers for wanting to save their hard earned cash, the gaming industry needs to learn to incentivize gamers into wanting to pony up to that $60 dollar price tag.

I titled this article The War on Used Games in an effort to be tongue-in-cheek and poke fun at how whenever the government declares war on drugs or terror or whatever it may be, they only succeed in exacerbating the problem. It should come as no surprise seeing as how the government tends to take the most asinine approach possible trying to “solve” problems. The end result is always the same; precious time and resources are wasted, and the issue is that much worse than it was before they intervened. If the gaming industry does indeed go down this path; they’ll only hurt themselves in the long run, fail to share in the revenue they so greedily covet and worst of all, hurt their customers, who keep the gaming industry abreast with currency.

It’s very ironic and actually very fitting that it’s EA who are spearheading the effort to attack the used game market when they themselves are one of the largest beneficiaries of used games. Chipsworld MD Don McCabe, told GamesIndustry.biz that EA has what he referred to as a “franchise software house” in that they “upgrade their titles; FIFA, Madden; all of these are effectively the same title upgraded each year. And people trade in last year’s for this year’s.” He went onto say that those titles are the ones which are most often traded in. Shutting down the used games market effectively destroys a tried and true method in which fans of EA’s franchises keep up-to-date with each of EA’s annual releases. Aside from nostalgia, what would be the point of holding onto FIFA 11, when FIFA 12 is right around the corner?

Don McCabe, an executive at Chipsworld, explains that, “consumers won’t prosper under this new system, as copies of the game will lose their resale value”. He goes on to say that retailers will “just readjust [the price] bearing in mind you have to buy the voucher.” The CEO of SwapGame cautions that “customers who trade in for cash or credit do so to acquire new games they could otherwise not afford.” This means that ultimately it will be the publisher who ends up losing money because when retailers adjust their prices to reflect the increase in cost for used games, the resale value of the game will drop and new games are less likely to be purchased.

I’m a fan of several EA franchises, I enjoy Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed and I’m a die hard Sony PlayStation enthusiast. As their customer, I’m outraged and offended by their current practices. I fear for what future methods they may use to further stifle or even kill the used game market. That said, I’m hopeful that these companies will be receptive to the outcry of their customers and adhere to our wants. I implore them to discontinue punishing their customers in an effort to capture what they perceive as missed profits. They risk not only alienating their customers but they risk finding themselves with significantly fewer customers and substantially less profit. And at the end of the day, that’s really the bottom line.

Is ADD Now TIADD – Technology Induced Attention Deficit Disorder?

Society today, ‘Today’ being defined as the time from the late 1980’s to the present, has undergone a rapid evolution in information collection, manipulation, storage and presentation. With the introduction of personal computers, the internet, smart phones and more, the life has been transformed into an environment where information readily becomes available on demand.

Along with this technology, comes greater expectation. Initially, users were limited to certain types of data; internal business data and standard news information, enabling people to provide limited information to management and peers.

As technology has become a focal point of life for most of the developed world, cost has decreased as rapidly as innovation has progressed, making information more accessible and affordable than ever before.

With this reduced cost and more readily available access, new problems have come to light. Business and human process began to rely more on technology. People began to rely on technology to make decisions or mange decisions. In the past, it was only businesses that relied on technology to drive efficiencies, creating expectation previously achieved through people, process and time. Now, personal expectations have been raised, for every aspect of our lives. This fundamental change in expectation is the foundation for our assertion that ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) has manifested itself in many aspects of our lives, both in and out of the workplace; our term for this is Technology Induced Attention Deficit Disorder or TIADD.

Twelve years ago we introduced TIADD to the business community as part of our methodology for resolving business efficiency issues in the workplace. In the late 1990’s, this disorder was manifesting itself regularly in the workplace, however throughout the early 2000’s, TIADD has begun to show up throughout society.

TIADD is a new foundation for inefficiency and vulnerability. An entire generation of worker is being trained to rely solely on technology to collect, analyze, process and distribute information. The inefficiencies are created through lack of planning and understanding of foundational business and personal process, as it relates to an organization or individual prior to technology implementation. Vulnerabilities are created when this technology is implemented with inefficiencies; people are psychologically affected by the negative impact of the technology. Additionally, the individual changes to business and personal process being used to circumvent technology based processes not properly learned, affect the overall performance of individual people, social groups and entire companies. These inefficiencies and vulnerabilities are the foundation for TIADD.

Physiology of the Problem

Since ADD has been determined to be a physiological disorder based on biological problems within the brain; it is important to clarify any physiological association to TIADD. Since, many people already have clinical ADD or ADHD, any condition caused by technology would only be a manifestation of their physiological issues. TIADD is a problem that is societal and caused solely by the introduction and reliance of technology in our current society. I do not begin to imply that TIADD is yet physiological or biological in nature; however I do believe that through evolution of technology and people, it may become a physiological issue.

Sociology of Problem

The sociology of TIADD is very clear. Society has become reliant on technology to streamline every facet of our life. People use technology to streamline communications, write letters analyze numbers. Mechanics utilize technology to diagnose cars, fix internal issues. Medical professionals use technology to quickly diagnose ailments and as reference tools to better understand case studies and application of remedy. Legal and banking professionals utilize technology to manipulate data and research trends or cases to quickly accomplish tasks that once took days, months or even years. And people use technology to forge relationships based on a new level of communication standard, one in which delay can affect the relationship both short and long term.

This change to the very fabric of business and life process has trained people to expect results, based on technology, in less and less time. If and often, when this technology fails to meet the individual, group or company expectations, impatience, distraction, impulsive requirements for information and results, hyper sensitivity to human interaction and a complete lack of social development within many social structures is causing a new uneasiness within society as a whole.

All of these symptoms are used to traditionally diagnose ADD, this onset of symptoms throughout society, is the basis for TIADD.

Technology Induced Attention Deficit Disorder has been established as a disorder, because of the use of psychology during the implementations of technology throughout the world. In analyzing issues related to business process failure, workplace lack of moral and the association to the implementation of technology, a correlation was noted between psychological issues in the workplace and these implementations. In addition, through the interview process of thousands of people, there was a common scenario; people were becoming more impatient and had less ability to function psychologically on problems that were once solved without technology. Additionally, apprehension and an inability to focus on problem solving or understand issues caused by behavior between people seemed to have a root in technology based changes.

These examples are based on issues with people that caused companies to consider technology enhancements, replacements or fixes; for business process and moral problems within their organization. The subjects used for this analysis are from all walks of life around the world.

Collection of Data

The collection of this data was governed by a structured data collection model known as BizVision, a very simple methodology, based on a series of questions, used to gain a high level understanding of the business process of people. The data also includes details about technology usage and individual interaction with other people. All of this data is compiled into a simple database for compilation and review. Models are designed, based on the process answers. Emotional and ability profiles were developed, to help determine the level of education at each position and the ability to teach new process or technologies.

It is during this part of the analysis that the psychological effects and abilities of each worker are reviewed again. We look at our data compilations and uncovered severe apprehension, lack of attention and inability to focus or change, as areas of concern. It is here that we saw TIADD manifest itself.

Our findings are simple and clear. As people have evolved with technology, their expectations for performance and ability to deal with human emotion caused by both personal and business process failures have changed. People have less ability to focus on problem solving, less ability to remain patient and less ability to accept people with less ability than themselves. These flaws and the ensuing result, lack of patience, lack of focus, emotional distress, work induced stress and human conflict at all levels point to TIADD.

People have been programmed into relying on technology to solve problems and solve them quickly. People do not want to offer patience or support to other people who cannot fix problems with the efficiencies expected in a technology based society. These expectations and lack of basic human qualities, once appreciated in society can now be defined as Technology Induced Attention Deficit Disorder.

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If You Could Play One Game For the Rest of Your Life, What Would it Be?

You’re an online game player. Probably an expert. Actually, you’re probably an expert at a bunch of different games. And you probably enjoy playing lots of different games, especially the new ones. But, if you were to pick just one, just one game that you would have to play for the rest of your life – what would it be? Would it be an old school board game like Monopoly or Risk? Would it be Prime Suspects or Mah Jong Quest? Perhaps it would be a puzzle such as Big Kahuna Reef, or Fish Tycoon in an underwater adventure? Or maybe you’re a Texas Hold Em fan. Whatever it is, you’re probably very passionate about it. You play it a lot. But that’s how you get to be good, right? It’s also a great way to pass the time and just have some fun.

Web Games

Many people, especially those who aren’t super sophisticated when it comes to online games, are just looking for a way to pass the time. These are the folks you may see playing the slots for 8 hours at the casinos. They enjoy games, but tend to like the simple ones, without a whole lot of strategy. Online card, arcade, and puzzle games provide lots of entertainment value for many people, everyday. As a bonus, many of these types of games are free to play on the Internet. These games run in a web browser, don’t require much hardware, and work on almost any computer.

If you could play only one game for the rest of your life, would it be a web game?

Puzzle Games

These types of games are very popular. Why? Many of them are free, or have a free version. There are also a lot of these types of games out there. What are some of the better ones?

Jewel Quest: You match jewels and quest through beautiful Mayan ruins in dozens of mind-bending puzzles, while discovering hidden treasures and priceless artifacts.

Prime Suspects: In what other game could you interview suspects, solve puzzles, and find key clues? Not many. That’s what makes Prime Suspects so cool. If you have a detective-like nature, you’ll be good at this one.

Bejeweled 2: Innovative, non-violent, the classic game of gem-swapping. Sound interesting? The goal is to match gems and colors as quickly as you can. Kids and adults love this one.

If you could play only one game for the rest of your life, would it be a puzzle game?

Card Games

Card games are as hot as ever. They require skill, they’re challenging and they’re fun. Games such as Tik’s Texas Hold Em and Super Poker Stars offer players three unique advantages. They offer the thrill of playing cards in a casino, there is no risk because there’s no money involved and best of all, players can test their skills against other card sharks. Online games are often new creations, but these games are new interpretations on the classics.

If you could only play one game for the rest of you life, would it be a classic card game?

Simulation Games

By now, everyone has heard of The Sims. Simulation games have skyrocketed in popularity and for those gamers who love to create their own world, the options are endless. You can build a city, a world or an amusement park with mind boggling roller coasters. You can even go back in time and relive medieval battles. So what is the draw of these types of games?

The hook is that as the game progresses, it gets more intricate. Take Cinema Tycoon for example. Start off with a small cinema and as you manage concessions, purchases new hit movies and try to avoid “flops” you build your cinema into a true Mega-Plex. This game is fun for all ages and levels of gamers.

If you could only play one game for the rest of you life, would it be a simulation game?

Strategy Games

If you enjoy games that challenge the mind, perhaps strategy games like Risk II and Chessmaster Challenge are what you are looking for. These games require you to flex those mental mussels. Many of the classic strategy games are available to be played online. You can match wits with your intellectual counterpart in Russia and find out who truly is the Chessmaster! Sound like fun? It is.

3D graphics have brought a new level of realism to strategy games. These games throw you into the action as if you were actually there…deploy your forces, attack your foes and build your armies. Strategy games are typically designed for no more than 12 simultaneous players. Many of these games are free, or have a free version online.

If you could only play one game for the rest of you life, would it be a strategy game?

Game Show Games

You love to win; there is no question about it. Competition is in your blood. Well, then maybe you could play a game show game for the rest of your life. Maybe you want to play Family Feud, the fast-paced game based on the successful Family Feud TV game show! Beat the average score, or go head-to-head with a friend or an entire family! Maybe you are a rock & roll junkie, test your music knowledge (from the golden oldies to current top bands) with Rock & Roll JEOPARDY!

If you could only play one game for the rest of you life, would it be a game show game?

Summary

Well, what did you decide? Would your one game be Texas Hold Em or Family Feud? Would you choose to become a Cinema Tycoon or take the Chessmaster Challenge? Fortunately, you don’t have to choose, but if you know what type of games you gravitate towards, perhaps you can uncover some new games that you never knew existed!